Last Night’s Numbers – 4/18/11

This is Last Night’s Numbers, a (mostly) daily feature where we run through the NBA games from the night before, highlighting one or two numbers I found particularly interesting from each game. All the stats are from Hoopdata’s box scores, which contain some additional advanced stats not available in traditional box scores.

Saturday

Chicago 104 – Indiana 99

  • The Bulls completely controlled the glass, grabbing 59% of the available rebounds, with an ORR of 50%. Joakim Noah had 11 rebounds, 8 coming at the offensive end.
  • With a FTR of 0.390 the Bulls had a 15 point advantage at the free throw line. Derrick Rose made 19 of 21 at the line.
  • The Pacers made just 10 of their 23 shots at the rim. Tyler Hansbrough was 2 of 8.

Dallas 89 – Portland 81

  • With a FTR of 0.439, the Mavericks had a 16 point advantage at the free throw line. Dirk Nowitzki was 13 of 13.
  • The Mavericks made 10 of 19 three-pointers. Jason Kidd led the way, making 6 of 10. The Trailblazers made just 2 of 16.
  • Their three-point shooting and free throws helped compensate for the fact that the Mavs made just 7 of 23 shots from inside of 10ft.

Miami 97 – Philadelphia 89

  • With a FTR 0.527, the Heat had a 19 point advantage at the free throw line. LeBron James was 13 of 14 from the line.
  • The 76ers shot 41.2% for the game. They made just 14 of 50 shots from beyond 10ft.
  • Thaddeus Young had 20 points for the 76ers on a 46.0 TS%. He was 7 of 11 on shots at the rim, and just 2 of 9 from everywhere else. Young also added 11 rebounds, 8 of which came at the offensive end.

Atlanta 103 – Orlando 93

  • Dwight Howard scored 46 points on a 70.4 TS%. He added 19 rebounds, 6 offensive, but turned the ball over 8 times.
  • The Hawks Offensive Rating for the game was 112.0. However, they turned the ball over on just 10.9% of their possessions, and made 48.2% of the long two-pointers. Those may not be sustainable levels of performance across the rest of the series.
  • The Magic made 6 of 22 three-pointers. Jameer Nelson made 4 of 7, which means the rest of the team made 2 of 15.

Sunday

Memphis 101  – San Antonio 98

  • The Grizzlies interior tandem of Marc Gasol and Zach Randolph overwhelmed the Spurs. They combined for 49 points on 19 of 25 shooting with 23 rebounds.
  • The Spurs posted a FTR of 0.671, gaining a 15 point advantage at the free throw line. However, they shot only 40% from the field, and made just 10 of 30 shots from outside of 15ft.
  • Mike Conley had 10 assists for the Grizzlies, 7 of which went for layups or three-pointers.

New Orleans 109 – L.A. Lakers 100

  • Chris Paul carried the Hornets to victory. He scored 33 points on a 70.9 TS%. He also had 7 rebounds, 4 steals and 14 assists, 10 of which went for layups or three-pointers.
  • Kobe Bryant scored 34 points but on a 57.6 TS%. He added 5 assists and 4 rebounds but also turned the ball over 5 times.
  • Despite the Lakers huge size advantage, the Hornets were able to hold them to just 14 shot attempts at the rim. Andrew Bynum, Pau Gasol and Lamar Odom combined to score just 8 points at the rim.

Boston 87 – New York 85

  • Ray Allen scored 24 points for the Celtics, on a 73.5 TS%. He made 3 of 5 three-pointers, including the game winner with 11 seconds left.
  • Boston turned the ball over on 20.5% of their possessions, but compensated by controlling the glass. They grabbed 56.4% of the available rebounds with an ORR of 41.7%.
  • Carmelo Anthony and Amare Stoudemire each took 18 shots for the Knicks. Stoudemire made 12 of those 18 for 28 points. Anthony made 5 of those 18 for 15 points.

Oklahoma City 107 – Denver 103

  • Both teams turned the ball over on exactly 11.9% of their possessions. Shooting percentages were also very close, with Denver at 50.7%, Oklahoma city at 49.4%. The difference was the Thunder making 9 of 19 three-pointers, the Nuggets just 4 of 16.
  • Kevin Durant scored 41 points for the Thunder on a 71.7 TS%. He was 12 of 15 at the free throw line and added 9 rebounds.
  • The Nuggets did a great job scoring on the interior, making 21 of 24 at the rim. They were just 18 of 53 from everywhere else on the floor.
Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Atlanta Hawks, Boston Celtics, Chicago Bulls, Dallas Mavericks, Denver Nuggets, Indiana Pacers, Last Night's Numbers, Los Angeles Lakers, Memphis Grizzlies, Miami Heat, NBA, New Orleans Hornets, New York Knicks, Oklahoma City Thunder, Orlando Magic, Philadelphia 76ers, Portland Trailblazers, San Antonio Spurs, Statistical Analysis

Playoff Picks

Jay nose picking

This season I participated in the inaugural Wages of Wins Network Stats Smackdown. Thank goodness it didn’t receive much attention, because I was thoroughly thumped. I put together what I called my Franken-Win Predictions, based on an unholy bastardization of several other statistical systems. It seemed fairly scientific at the time, but I might as well have been using a Magic Eight Ball. Here are my preseason picks:

There are 1,230 wins available in each season. My predictions were off by a total of 221 wins. The only records I guessed correctly were Atlanta and New Orleans. The only other records where I was off by two or less wins were Orlando, Charlotte, Utah and the Lakers. I was off by 24 wins for the Sacramento Kings. I missed the Cavaliers record by 18 wins. I won’t even bother to review my awards picks. Let’s just say that Josh McRoberts was not in the running for Most Improved Player and leave it at that.

Trading in the last shreds of my credibility, I’m going to participate in the playoff extension of this contest. Check out the other sites in The Wages of Wins Network for their picks and the contest rules. This time I’ll be abandoning any pretense of analytic predictions, instead relying on my rather significant gut. Here are my initial picks:

1st Round:

Chicago in 6
Orlando in 5
Boston in 6
Miami in 5
San Antonio in 7
Oklahoma City in 6
Dallas in 6
L.A. Lakers in 5

2nd Round:

Chicago in 6
Boston in 6
Oklahoma City in 7
L.A. Lakers in 6

Conference Finals:

Chicago in 6
L.A. Lakers in 7

Finals:

Lakers in 7

Feel free to stop by an gloat in the comments section as these picks explode in my face!

 

2 Comments

Filed under NBA, Statistical Analysis

Last Night’s Numbers – 4/14/11

This is Last Night’s Numbers, a (mostly) daily feature where we run through the NBA games from the night before, highlighting one or two numbers I found particularly interesting from each game. All the stats are from Hoopdata’s box scores, which contain some additional advanced stats not available in traditional box scores.

Boston 112 – New York 102

  • The Celtics’ offense, minus their typical starters, exploded against the Knicks. They shot 56.5% from the field, and made 8 of their 17 three-pointers.
  • Avery Bradley scored 20 points in 27 minutes, on a 62.5 TS%. Bradley was 6 of 7 on shots at the rim.
  • The Knicks were 23 of 33 on shots at the rim, but just 10 of 38 on shots from beyond 15ft.

Chicago 97 – New Jersey 92

  • Joakim Noah had a double-double with 10 points and 10 rebounds in 23 minutes. 7 of his 10 rebounds came at the offensive end.
  • With a FTR of 0.342, the Chicago Bulls gave themselves an 8 point advantage at the free throw line.
  • Jordan Farmar scored 21 points on a 59.5 TS%. He also added 12 assists, 5 of which went for layups or three pointers.

Cleveland 100 – Washington 93

  • With a FTR of 0.349, the Cavs gave themselves a 14 point advantage at the free throw line. Ramon Sessions made 11 of 12.
  • Jordan Crawford finished his rookie season shooting 2 of 14. He missed all 11 of his shots that didn’t come at the rim.
  • J.J. Hickson had 13 rebounds, 6 of which came at the offensive end.

Dallas 121 – New Orleans 89

  • With a FTR of 0.466, the Mavericks gave themselves a 13 point advantage at the free throw line.
  • In just 20 minutes, J.J. Barea scored 14 points on a 77.1 TS%, with 8 assists. Barea was 7 of 7 at the free throw line, and 4 of his 8 assists went for layups or three-pointers.
  • Just 23 of the Hornets’ 79 field goal attempts came from inside of 10ft.

Golden State 110 – Portland 86

  • The two teams combined to make 21 of 49 three-pointers. Reggie Williams, Patrick Mills and Wesley Matthews each made 4.
  • Reggie Williams scored 28 points for the Warriors on a 77.8 TS%. 11 of his 12 made baskets were assisted on.
  • The Warriors made 26 of 37 shots at the rim, on their way to a 51.2% shooting performance on the night.

L.A. Clippers 110 – Memphis 103

  • Blake Griffin finished his rookie season with a triple-double. Griffin had 31 points on a 64.4 TS%, with 10 rebounds and 10 assists.
  • The Clippers made 26 of 29 shots at the rim. 47 of their 81 shot attempts came within 10ft. of the basket.
  • The Grizzlies turned the ball over on 20.8% of their possessions. O.J. Mayo had 5 in just 30 minutes.

Houston 121 – Minnesota 102

  • Chase Budinger exploded for 35 points on a 72.7 TS%. He made all 7 of his free throws, 4 of 8 three pointers, will contributing 6 rebounds, 4 assists and 2 steals.
  • Goran Dragic totalled a triple-double with 11 points, 11 rebounds and 11 assists. He put it together in exactly 44 minutes.
  • Anthony Randolph continued his string of strong performances to finish the season. Randolph had 23 points on a 65.9 TS%. He made 8 of his 9 shots at the rim.

Orlando 92 – Indiana 74

  • The Magic turned the ball over on 27.5% of their possessions . . . . and still beat the Pacers by 18. Earl Clark had 6 turnovers in 17 minutes.
  • The Pacers shot 30.7% for the game, making just 5 of 14 shots at the rim.
  • Brandon Rush scored 16 points for the Pacers, on 16 shots. He was 5 of 9 on three-pointers, 0 of 7 on two-pointers.

Detroit 104 – Philadelphia 100

  • With a FTR of 0.408, the Pistons gave themselves a 10 point advantage at the free throw line.
  • Rodney Stuckey finished the season with a strong performance. Stuckey scored 29 points on a 73.1 TS%. He made 10 of 11 free throws, and added 8 assists.
  • The 76ers made 21 of 25 shots at the rim and inexplicably missed all 10 of their shots in the 3-9ft. area.

Phoenix 106 – San Antonio 103

  • Marcin Gortat scored 21 points for the Suns, on a 60.6 TS%. Gortat also had 13 rebounds, 4 of which came at the offensive end.
  • The two teams combined for just 14 turnovers on 190 possessions. That’s a TOV% of 7.4%.
  • Steve Nash had 10 assists for the Suns, 7 of which went for layups or three-pointers.

L.A. Lakers 116 – Sacramento 108 (OT)

  • Kobe Bryant scored 36 points in 38 minutes. He did it on a 63.4 TS%, adding 9 rebounds and 6 assists.
  • Samuel Dalembert had 18 points and 18 rebounds for the Kings. 9 of his 18 rebounds came at the offensive end.
  • The Kings were 11 of 19 at the free throw line, giving the Lakers a 9 point advantage.

Milwaukee 110 – Oklahoma City 106

  • The Thunder, giving limited minutes to their normal rotation players, turned the ball over on 22.9% of their possessions.
  • The Bucks used 11 different players in the game, 7 of which scored in double-figures.
  • Michael Redd played 29 minutes for the Bucks, the most he’s played since January 8th, 2010. Redd scored 11 points on 5 of 10 from the field, knocking down 1 of his 3 three-pointers.

Utah 107 – Denver 103

  • Gordon Hayward had a career night for the Jazz. Hayward scored 34 points on an 88.5 TS%. He was 5 of 5 at the free throw line and made 5 of 6 three-pointers.
  • Both teams turned the ball over on exactly 16.8% of their possessions. They also posted identical FTRs, 0.338, and both made 39 of 77 from the field. The different was Utah’s 8 of 15 shooting on three pointers.

Miami 97 – Toronto 79

  • Toronto posted a FTR 0.531, but made only 22 of 34 at the line.
  • The Heat made 13 of 26 three-pointers. Eddie House and James Jones combined to make 11 of 19.
  • The Raptors shot 43.8% for the game. They were just 12 of 40 on shots that didn’t come at the rim.

Charlotte 96 – Atlanta 85

  • Charlotte turned the ball over on just 10% of their possessions, compared to 15.6% for the Hawks.
  • The Bobcats made 18 of 34 long two-pointers, an absurd 53.0%.

Leave a comment

Filed under Atlanta Hawks, Boston Celtics, Charlotte Bobcats, Chicago Bulls, Cleveland Cavaliers, Dallas Mavericks, Denver Nuggets, Detroit Pistons, Golden State Warriors, Houston Rockets, Indiana Pacers, Last Night's Numbers, Los Angeles Clippers, Los Angeles Lakers, Memphis Grizzlies, Miami Heat, Milwaukee Bucks, Minnesota Timberwolves, NBA, New Jersey Nets, New Orleans Hornets, New York Knicks, Oklahoma City Thunder, Orlando Magic, Philadelphia 76ers, Phoenix Suns, Portland Trailblazers, Sacramento Kings, San Antonio Spurs, Statistical Analysis, Toronto Raptors, Utah Jazz, Washington Wizards

NBA Anti-Awards: Final Edition

With the regular season now in our rear-view mirror, bloggers and basketball writers will be posting their choices for winners of the NBA’s postseason awards. Earlier this year, in a bout of malaise and general curmudgeonliness I created a handful of awards for some of the worst and most discouraging achievements of the season. The games have been played, the turnovers have been tabulated. It’s time for the NBA Anti-Awards to be handed out.

The Shawn Bradley Award – This award goes to the player 6’10″ or taller who has had the highest percentage of his shot attempts blocked (minimum 500 minutes played).

Bulls’ rookie, Omer Asik, led this category almost from start to finish. As the season wound down he was briefly overtaken by a late charge from the Hawks’ Zaza Pachulia. However, with Pachulia taking three shots without being blocked on the final night of the season, Asik passed him to win this award by the slimmest of magins. Pachulia finished with 19.0% of his shots blocked, Asik with 19.1%. Asik’s unique blend of size and general awkwardness should make him a contender in this category for years to come.

The Shawn Kemp Award – This award goes to the player who has fouled out of the most games. From 1986 up through the present, Shawn Kemp is the NBA’s leader in foul outs with 115, 35 more than his next closest competitor.

DeMarcus Cousins locked this one up, fouling out twice in his last eight games. Cousins finished the season with 10 disqualifications due to personal fouls. He put in a lot of work to make this award possible, committing 328 personal fouls on the season, 65 more than the next closest player. Cousins would like to thank his colleagues for all their wonderfully well-executed pump fakes.

The Jahidi White AwardThis award goes to the player with the lowest ratio of Ast/FGA (minimum 500 minutes played). The award is named for White who assisted on just 1.7% of his teammates’ baskets over a 334 game career.

Serge Ibaka is this year’s Jahidi White Award winner. Ibaka totalled 21 assists against 613 field goal attempts, for a ratio of 0.03. It’s tough to fault Ibaka. Playing alongside Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook, a guy has to take any opportunity he can to get a shot up.

The Darrick Martin Award – This award goes to the player with the lowest FG% and a minimum of 300 attempts. The award is named for Darrick Martin, a career 38.2% shooter who played 514 games over 13 NBA seasons.

As I mentioned in previous updates there was a lot of movement in this category throughout the season, as players who shoot under 40% tend to find themselves outside the playing rotation. Pacers’ second-year point guard, A.J. Price, bucked the trend seeing progressively more playing time as his FG% plummeted. Price shot 35.7% on the season, narrowly edging cagy veteran Jason Kidd. Well done young fella’!

The Jason Kidd Award – This award goes to the player with the most turnovers in a single game. Jason Kidd has had a Hall of Fame career with many terrific positive statistical contributions. He’s also had 3 career games with more than 12 turnovers.

Amare Stoudemire‘s 11 turnover game against Washington, on December 10th, finished the season as the highest in the league. Derrick Rose made a late charge, posting games of 9 and 10 turnovers in February and March, but ultimately fell short. Rose will have to console himself with the NBA’s MVP award.

The Matt Bullard AwardThis award goes to the player 6’10″ or taller with the lowest Total Rebound Percentage. (Minimum 500 minutes)

This was one of our most competitive awards. At times Brook Lopez, Danilo Gallinari, Hedo Turkoglu and Andrea Bargnani all looked like clear favorites. In the end, dark horse candidate, Donte Green of the Sacramento Kings emerged as our winner. Greene, who stands 6 feet, 11 inches tall, grabbed just 7.4% of the total rebounds available while he was on the floor.

The Kobe Bryant AwardThis award goes to the player who has missed the most shot attempts in a single game. The award is inspired by Kobe’s performance in Game 7 of the Finals last season.

Surprisingly, this was our only category that finished with a tie. Kobe Bryant‘s 21 missed field goals, on November 11th against Denver, were matched just 16 days ago by Monta Ellis. Both players would probably rather throw this award away then put in on their mantles. I hope it doesn’t take them 21 tries to get it into the garbage can.

The Nick Anderson Award – This award goes to the player who missed the most free throws in a single game. Anderson was actually a decent free throw shooter. But his four missed free throw attempts in the 1995 Finals against Houston kind of stand out in my memory.

As expected Dwight Howard easily takes this award. This season he has missed 12 free throws in a game once, 11 free throws three times, and 10 free throws three times. Hopefully, taking home this hardware will lessen the sting of missing out on the MVP.

The Chris Childs AwardThis award goes to the player who has posted the highest Turnover Percentage so far this season. It’s named after former New York Knick Chris Childs, who retired with a career Turnover Percentage of 22.8%. (Minimum 500 minutes)

Joel Pryzbilla just barely topped our minutes requirement, stealing this award from Chris Duhon. Pryzbilla finished the season with a TO% of 34.2%. That means more than one out of every three Pryzbilla possessions ended with an offensive foul, a wild pass into the stands, or a dribble off his own leg.

The Andrea Bargnani Award (Formerly the Darius Songaila Award)– This award goes to the player who has provided his team with the least overall production. I use Wins Produced to determine the winner here. (Minimum 500 minutes)

Toronto’s Andrea Bargnani has been the favorite all season, and in the end, he did not disappoint. With a WP48 of -0.122 he’s “contributed” -6.0 wins in 2,353 minutes. As promised to several disgruntled Raptor fans, this award has now been renamed The Andrea Bargnani Award.

Congratulations to all the winners, it was a wonderful season of folly and futility!

8 Comments

Filed under Charlotte Bobcats, Chicago Bulls, Golden State Warriors, Indiana Pacers, Los Angeles Lakers, NBA, New York Knicks, Oklahoma City Thunder, Orlando Magic, Sacramento Kings, Statistical Analysis, Toronto Raptors

Technically Speaking

Ortofon on Technics SL 1200 MKII

A big storyline entering this season was the NBA’s tweaking of it’s technical foul policy. The new guidelines enumerated specific actions as worthy of a technical:

  • Players making aggressive gestures, such as air punches, anywhere on the court
  • Demonstrative disagreement, such as when a player incredulously raises his hands, or smacks his own arm to demonstrate how he was fouled
  • Running directly at an official to complain about a call
  • Excessive inquiries about a call, even in a civilized tone

There was plenty of discussion about the new policy, most of it with a negative slant. The prevailing opinion seemed to be that this would remove legitimate emotional reactions from the game; reactions that were natural, unlikely to be controlled, and which had always been a part of the game. This all came to a head in the  preseason, when Kevin Garnett was ejected for arguing a call; arguing in a manner that certainly would not have resulted in an ejection in years past. The policy has continued to be implemented. However, the public outcry and attention paid to it has largely died away.

929 technical fouls have been handed out to players this season, a significant increase over the 730 meted out last year. It’s not unexpected however, given the new enforcement policy. What has been surprising is the number of technicals fouls which have been rescinded by the league, after the fact. With just one night of action remaining in the regular season, 67 technicals have been rescinded. I don’t have the total for last year to make a comparison, but that number seems extremely high. In fact, it represents 7.2% of all the technical fouls assessed to players this season.

Since the Tim Donaghy scandal, the NBA has taken several steps (many superficial) to address the issue of fan confidence in officiating. If you asked David Stern, I’m sure he would acknowledge the fact that NBA referees do sometimes make mistakes. I would also guess that he would argue their rate of errors is fewer than 1 in 100. That’s why I find it so bizarre that 67 technical fouls have been rescinded. It seems to me, to be a tacit admission by the league that 7.2% of the technical fouls called on players this season were a mistake. For an organization that has demonstrated an almost pathological unwillingness to publicly engage in self-criticism, this seems wholly incongruous and out of character.

I realize errors in assessing technical fouls are a different animal than errors in calling things like goaltending or double-dribbling. These calls theoretically have no component of subjectivity. Goaltending and double-dribbling are explicitly defined in the NBA rulebook; there is no gray area on what does or does not constitute each of those infractions. Occassionally, subjectivity enters the equation when an official has to process visual information, and determine if what they saw fit that description.

When it comes to technical fouls, ambiguity is literally written into the rulebook. Here’s a few quotes from the section on technical fouls, italics and bolding are mine.

  • “Running tirades, continuous criticism or griping may be sufficient cause to assess a technical.”
  • “Assessment of a technical foul shall be avoided whenever and wherever possible; but,when necessary they are to be assessed without delay or procrastination.”
  • “A technical foul(s) may be assessed to any player on the court or anyone seated on the bench for conduct which, in the opinion of an official, is detrimental to the game.”

Perhaps I’m reading these items wrong, but they seem to be explicitly allowing officials to use their own judgement in deciding when to assess a technical foul. So, by extension, when the league rescinds a technical foul they are not impuning a referee’s objective observation skills, instead they are impuning their subjective judgement on whether a situation fits any number of amibiguous criteria.

The other craw-sticking point is that it seemed the NBA instituted their new guidelines this summer in an effort to standardize the assessing of technical fouls, and remove some of the subjective judgements officials were being asked to make. From my own observations, it would seem the calling of technicals this season has been fairly consistent, incorporating the new guidelines. But by rescinding so many, the league is quietly undermining that consistency.

It doesn’t help that the league is not in the habit of offerring explanations of why particular technicals were rescinded. This is probably a good thing since I can’t see how much of the current wording in the rulebook could be used to construct a compelling argument to override an official’s decision in the flow of a game.

Conspiracy theorists and small-market purists argue that the rescinding of technicals is an underhanded way for the league to favor it’s stars. There is not much evidence to support that argument. Dwight Howard has had four technicals rescinded this season. So has Tyson Chandler. Chris Paul has had two technicals rescinded. So has Chris Wilcox. None of Dwyane Wade‘s 12 technical fouls have been taken away.

The fact that the system doesn’t reflect overt favoritism for stars doesn’t mean there’s not a problem. One mistake out of a hundred could be acceptable. I don’t feel comfortable saying the same thing about seven mistakes out of a hundred. The league seemed to be taking steps to solve the problem by releasing these more explicit guidelines before the season started. However, they’ve shot themselves in the foot 67 times, by withdrawing technical fouls without explaining why those cases didn’t fit into their guidelines. As I argued above, I’m not sure how they could even put together rational explanations.

As I see it there are two solutions. They can either create a written definition of technical fouls which leaves no room for individual interpretation. The second is that they publicly place complete trust in the officials, and stop rescinding technicals in all but the most grevious instances of error. I’m not sure how the first option could be feasibly implemented, which leaves us with the second.

On the surface, it doesn’t appear the league sees a problem with the current system. I see the problem as a lack of trust. The way the rules are written implies that the league trusts the officials to make the right call with regards to technicals. The 67 rescinded fouls implies that they don’t. The NBA keeps asking us, as fans, to believe that they have the “best officials in the world.” I want to believe that, I really do. So why do they insist on making me feel like they don’t even believe their own claims?

1 Comment

Filed under NBA, Statistical Analysis

Last Night’s Numbers – 4/12/11

This is Last Night’s Numbers, a (mostly) daily feature where we run through the NBA games from the night before, highlighting one or two numbers I found particularly interesting from each game. All the stats are from Hoopdata’s box scores, which contain some additional advanced stats not available in traditional box scores.

Miami 98 – Atlanta 90

  • The Hawks missed 9 free throws in the game, finishing at 12 of 21. Josh Smith and Zaza Pachulia combined to go 3 of 9.
  • Miami turned the ball over on 21.3% of their possessions. LeBron James was responsible for 7 of their 19 total turnovers.
  • LeBron scored 34 points on a 62.5 TS%. He also had 10 rebounds, 7 assists and 3 steals.

Utah 90 – New Orleans 78

  • The Jazz shot 55.3% for the game. They made 18 of their 24 shots inside of 10ft.
  • The Hornets shot 37.9% for the game and made just 12 of 32 shots from inside of 10ft.
  • The Jazz recorded 25 assists on 37 made baskets for an Ast% of 67.6%.

Denver 134 – Golden State 111

  • The Nuggets turned the ball over on just 7.7% of their possessions.
  • The Warriors hit 13 of their 25 three-point attempts in the game. Four different players made at least 3 three pointers.
  • Chris Anderson has 12 rebounds and 4 blocks in just 22 minutes for the Nuggets. He also added 14 points on 6 of 10 shooting.

Cleveland 110 – Detroit 101

  • Cleveland turned the ball over on 6.5% of their possessions, compared to 17.2% for the Pistons.
  • Rodney Stuckey scored 29 points on a 73.5 TS%. He also added 14 assists, 10 of which went for layups or three-pointers.
  • The Cavaliers made 26 of 37 of the shots at the rim. J.J. Hickson led the way, making 7 of 11.

Dallas 98 – Houston 91 (OT)

  • Houston used just seven players in the game. None played fewer than 30 minutes.
  • Kevin Martin led the Rockets with 28 points. His TS% was just 52.6% and he turned the ball over 7 times.
  • The Rockets shot 19 of 70, or 27.1%, on all of their shots which didn’t come at the rim.

Milwaukee 93 – Toronto 86

  • The Raptors turned the ball over on 21.1% of their possessions. Jerryd Bayless led the team with 6.
  • Joey Dorsey had 20 rebounds in 33 minutes for the Raptors. 10 of his 20 rebounds came at the offensive end.
  • John Salmons scored 24 points for the Bucks on a 70.3 TS%. He also had 7 rebounds, 2 assists and a steal.

Charlotte 105 – New Jersey 103

  • The Bobcats shot 57% for the game, making 17 of their 22 shots at the rim. They also knocked down 14 of 25 long two-pointers.
  • Brook Lopez scored 31 points for the Nets on a 58.4 TS%. As usual he had just 3 rebounds.
  • D.J. Augustin had 11 assists. 8 of those 11 assists went for layups or three-pointers.

Orlando 95 – Philadelphia 85

  • Ryan Anderson had 18 points and 14 rebounds in just 22 minutes. Anderson made 3 of 5 three-pointers.
  • The Magic dominated the glass, grabbing 64.4% of the available rebounds, with an ORR of 45.2%. Ryan Anderson had 7 of their 19 offensive rebounds.
  • The 76ers made just 14 of their 47 shot attempts from beyond 15ft.

Phoenix 135 – Minnesota 127

  • Channing Frye scored 33 points for the Suns on a 91.7 TS%. He was 9 of 14 on three-pointers and all 12 of his made field goals were assisted on.
  • As a team, the Suns made 18 of 29 three-pointers. Channing Frye was responsible for a huge portion of that, but Jared Dudley helped out, making 5 of 5.
  • Luke Ridnour scored 21 points for the Timberwolves on an 80.8 TS%. He also added 9 rebounds, 9 assists and 5 turnovers.

Oklahoma City 120 – Sacramento 112

  • There were some absurd free throw totals in this game. Kevin Durant made 15 of 17. DeMarcus Cousins made 18 of 21. The two teams combined to make 70 of 79.
  • The Thunder turned the ball over on 19.0% of their possessions. Russell Westbrook and Durant combined for 12 of those turnovers.
  • The Thunder made 18 of 23 shots at the rim. The Kings made just 9 of 21.

Washington 95 – Boston 94

  • John Wall scored 24 points in 46 minutes. He was 5 of 17 from the field, but 14 of 15 at the free throw line.
  • Both teams had more turnovers than assists. The Celtics had 21 turnovers to 20 assists. The Wizards had 18 turnovers to 14 assists.
  • The Celtics made just 9 of 35 shots from beyond 15ft.

Leave a comment

Filed under Atlanta Hawks, Boston Celtics, Charlotte Bobcats, Cleveland Cavaliers, Dallas Mavericks, Denver Nuggets, Detroit Pistons, Golden State Warriors, Houston Rockets, Last Night's Numbers, Miami Heat, Milwaukee Bucks, Minnesota Timberwolves, NBA, New Jersey Nets, New Orleans Hornets, Oklahoma City Thunder, Orlando Magic, Philadelphia 76ers, Phoenix Suns, Sacramento Kings, Statistical Analysis, Toronto Raptors, Utah Jazz, Washington Wizards

Last Night’s Numbers – 4/8/11

This is Last Night’s Numbers, a daily feature where we run through the NBA games from the night before, highlighting one or two numbers I found particularly interesting from each game. All the stats are from Hoopdata’s box scores, which contain some additional advanced stats not available in traditional box scores.

Chicago 97 – Boston 81

  • Boston shot 38.4% for the game. The especially struggled to score around the basket, making just 11 of 35 shots inside of 10ft.
  • Derrick Rose scored 30 points on a 73.5 TS%. Rose was a perfect 10 of 10 at the free throw line and handed out 8 assists with just 3 turnovers.
  • The Bulls grabbed 55.6% of the total rebounds, with an ORR of 25.0%. Carlos Boozer led the way 12 of their 44 rebounds.

Portland 98 – Utah 87

Leave a comment

Filed under Boston Celtics, Chicago Bulls, Last Night's Numbers, NBA, Portland Trailblazers, Statistical Analysis, Utah Jazz